jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.
As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.
Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.
That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.
And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.

As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.

Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.

That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.

And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

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lilveganmami:

punkrockgurl69:

thinkmexican:

Mexico Takes to the Streets for Students of Ayotzinapa

Mexicans took to the streets on Wednesday in impromptu marches in support of students from a rural teachers’ college in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, who were murdered and disappeared in late September. Police officers and cartel members are suspected of burying the students in mass graves, which were discovered on Saturday. The public outcry led to a call for a national march to demand justice.

More than 50 cities participated from Chiapas to Baja California.

Photos via Proceso, La Jornada

This is important

I feel like everyone talks about Mexican emigration to the U.S., but no one talks about why Mexican families are fleeing the country. Always curious why people refer to these families as “illegal immigrants” instead of “refugees”. When you promote deportation of Mexicans who have illegally crossed the border, you are trying to send many of them back to small border towns that have become war zones run by corrupt police and drug cartels.